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Course Descriptions

 

2-Day Intermediate/Clinical Level Exam Prep

4-Day Clinical Supervision in Social Work Course

SEPT 2018: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Advanced Clinical Supervision in Social Work (Refresher Course)

OCT 2018: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Ethical Clinical Decision Making

Responding Clinically to Trauma Experienced by Families as a Result of Immigration Separation

NOV 2018: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

A Practical Guide to Creating Your Own Successful Private Counseling Practice 

JAN 2019: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

To register and pay by credit card, click here 

  

2-Day Intermediate/Clinical Level Exam Prep

Date: Day 1, Friday, September 7, 2018 - Day 2, Friday, September 14, 20

Time: 9:00 AM – 4:00 pm (Both Days)

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $200

(Includes parking both days at the stadium parking garage)

(Also includes a complimentary copy of the brand new NASW Code of Ethics)

Register:  Here

About the Course

Day 1

In this updated course, students are taught the necessary skills to successfully prepare for the licensing exam. Helpful tips will guide students toward concentrating their preparation in areas helpful to success. Handouts include practice test questions and answers that will help students develop confidence to take the exam.

Day 2

In this revised format, students are taught the necessary skills to prepare for the DSM-5 section of the licensing exam. There are intensive reviews of major topics with particular attention to DSM-5. Handouts and practice tests for the LMSW, LMSW-AP, and LCSW exams are included. Students develop the necessary confidence to take the exam.

Objectives

By the end of this course, fully engaged participants will be able to:

Day 1 Upon concluding this segment of the course, students will be able to:

  • List the values and standard areas in the most current edition of the NASW Code of Ethics.
  • List the primary concepts for at least 3 different theories of psychosocial development.
  • List at least 3 theoretical frameworks for direct social work practice with individuals, families, and groups. 

Day 2 Upon concluding this segment of the course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the diagnostic criteria for five different types of disorders including schizophrenia, Bipolar I and Bipolar II mood disorders and three different types of personality disorders.

About the Instructor

Patricia Taylor, Ph.D., LCSW is a licensed clinical social worker and approved Texas LCSW supervisor who has practiced in the Houston area and taught clinical courses at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work for the last 14 years. She is currently Curriculum Coordinator for the Child Welfare Education Project and adjunct faculty member at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. She presented numerous workshops for the Protective Services Training Institute of Texas and presented research by invitation at professional meetings. She is also highly experienced at teaching Intermediate/Clinical Level Exam Prep and has a very high pass rate among students taking this course. It is important that students take both parts of this course.

 

4-Day Clinical Supervision in Social Work Course

Date: 
Day 1: Thursday, September 13, 2018
Day 2: Friday, September 14, 2018
Day 3: Thursday, September 27, 2018
Day 4: Friday, September 28, 2018

Time: 8:30 AM – 4:30 pm (All Four Days)

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work - Multipurpose Room

Course Fee: $600 Early Bird, $650 after August 31, 2018

(Includes parking all four days at the stadium parking garage)

Register:  Here

About the Course

This 40-hour course is designed for Licensed Clinical Social Workers who are interested in creating a highly ethical supervision practice and advancing their knowledge, skill, and experience in clinical social work supervision to fulfill licensing requirements to be an approved LCSW supervisor (as set forth by the Texas State Board of Social Worker Examiners 781.102). This course will be delivered in 28 hours of face-to-face classroom work and in 12 hours of supervised, independent, structured work designed for course preparation, exploration, reflection, and integration of content. Please note: An LCSW must have two years of practice experience prior to applying to be a Board Approved Supervisor. The four-day course will consist of five modules and twelve hours of independent work to be completed throughout the course period. Independent work consists of an in-depth review of the TSBSWE rules and regulations regarding LCSW clinical supervision, exploration of supervisory fit and style, assigned readings, and development of essential supervisory forms.

Objectives

This highly interactive and experiential course is grounded in a strong ethical framework to allow for the most effective clinical supervision experience. Actively engaging in connecting course content with ethics, the course covers five major modules:

  • Key Elements of Clinical Social Work Supervision:
    Creating and Sustaining an Effective and Ethical Supervisory Relationship 
  • Process and Phases of Clinical Social Work Supervision:
    Promoting Growth, Development and Self-Care

  • Supervisory Models and Methods:
    Developing Conceptual Knowledge of Models, Methods, and Techniques

  • Critical Issues in Clinical Social Work Supervision:
    Managing Ethical and Clinical Challenges in the Supervisory Relationship

  • Cultural Competence, Ethical Decision Making, Ethics and Legal Issues:
    Maintaining an Ethical Practice of Clinical Supervision
Participants will receive a 40-hour certificate of completion for the course (that includes 12 hours of ethics training) if they have attended all 28 hours of face-to-face classes and completed all 12 hours of independent work. Please note: Additional fees will apply if any make-up assignments are required, and this will likely delay receipt of the certificate of course completion.

Course Faculty

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, ACSW, DCSW
Shubhra Endley, LCSW
Ada Cheung, Ph.D., LCSW

Course faculty are clinical social work practitioners, approved LCSW supervisors with extensive experience in providing clinical supervision to social workers, and have served as Faculty and Adjunct Faculty at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work.

 

Fall 2018: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Date: September 21, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 pm

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Free Parking in the stadium parking garage at the corner of Cullen Boulevard and Holman.

Register:  Here

About the Course

Most social workers will encounter suicidal clients more than once in their careers. While suicide is the penultimate act we wish to avoid, practitioners must also intervene with non-fatal suicidal behaviors that occur with higher frequency. These include suicidal ideation or thoughts; suicidal verbalization, often in the form of suicide threats, intentional self-harm, and suicide attempts. Research on suicidal behavior now indicates that non-fatal suicidal behaviors are often most effectively reduced via systematic focus and specialized intervention strategies. This course will assist social workers in identifying, assessing, and managing the clinical risks associated with suicidal behavior as well as expose them to the most recent empirical research advances in treating suicidal behavior.

Objectives

By the end of this course, fully engaged participants will be able to:

  • Identify incidence and prevalence of various suicidal behaviors in demographic and diagnostic groups
  • Explore ethical considerations and implications related to suicidality
  • Gain knowledge of the significance of culture, race, and ethnicity on suicidality
  • Gain knowledge of religious/spiritual influences on suicidality
  • Gain knowledge of risk, identification, and assessment of suicidal behaviors in children and adolescents
  • Understand some core evidence-based treatment interventions for suicidality (e.g., Crisis management, Psychopharmacology, CBT, DBT)

About the Instructor

Dr. Robin E. Gearing is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston and a Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He also has extensive experience practicing as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment service for more than twenty years. Dr. Gearing’s program of research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health service use and treatment interventions. His research examines and seeks to build on improving and family treatment engagement, adherence, and developing evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for youth with mental illness and their families. In addition to other forums, findings from Dr. Gearing’s research have appeared in over 50 peer-review journal publications.

 

Advanced Clinical Supervision in Social Work (Refresher Course)

Date: October 4, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

About the Course

Using the ground-breaking work of Stephen R. Covey (Seven Habits of Highly Effective People) as a framework, this 3-hour session will explore seven areas of significance to clinical social work supervisors. This highly interactive session will briefly define the significance of areas in the process of supervision, allow for individual participant’s assessment of their strengths and limitations, and ultimately identify specific strategies for improving one’s effectiveness as an ethically competent clinical social supervisor. This session is designed for social workers who have met the earlier requirements of a 40-hour course and who now want to meet the established requirements for advanced clinical supervisor training as set forth by the Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners.

Objectives

By the end of this course, fully engaged participants will be able to:

  • Develop a framework for understanding seven key areas related to the process and practice of clinical supervision in social work.
  • Assess their strengths and limitations around these seven established areas.
  • Identify specific strategies for improving one’s effectiveness as an ethically competent clinical supervisor.

About the Instructor

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, ACSW, DCSW is a retired clinical professor from the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and maintains a clinical and consulting practice in Houston. She has over 34 years of social work experience and has provided supervision and consultation to numerous social workers pursuing their LCSW.

 

Helping Parents of Children in Foster Care Create a Healthy Environment and Achieve Normalcy While Recognizing Our Unintended Biases

Date: October 5, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon

Location: 
Youth Service Center (Room 204-2nd Floor)
6300 Chimney Rock
Houston, Texas 77081

Fee: $75

Register:  Here

About the Course

This training is to provide awareness of the minimum standards put in place by the State of Texas for children in foster care. The training will promote awareness and understanding and help participants gain knowledge about why it is important for children in foster care to achieve “normalcy” and to help them instill resiliency in the children. This training will also help participants recognize any biases or stigmas they may have internalized.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the factors that can affect normalcy in children placed in foster care.

  2. Understand the Sunset Review Board’s findings of children in foster care and manage prudent parenting judgment associated with normalcy.

  3. Learn about diversity and how we are personally impacted by it.

  4. Develop mutual respect for adversity and difference.

  5. Work effectively and strategically within our environment to influence change.

About the Instructor

Gracie Pequeno was employed for six years as a Senior Advanced Specialist for the Brazoria County CPS Conservatorship Unit. She served as Program Director and Administrator for the non-profit CPA and now serves as Program Grant Manager for Brazosport College, where she empowers adults through the adult education and literacy programs.

 

Fall 2018: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Date: October 19, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Free Parking in the stadium parking garage at the corner of Cullen Boulevard and Holman.

Register:  Here

About the Course

Most social workers will encounter suicidal clients more than once in their careers. While suicide is the penultimate act we wish to avoid, practitioners must also intervene with non-fatal suicidal behaviors that occur with higher frequency. These include suicidal ideation or thoughts; suicidal verbalization, often in the form of suicide threats, intentional self-harm, and suicide attempts. Research on suicidal behavior now indicates that non-fatal suicidal behaviors are often most effectively reduced via systematic focus and specialized intervention strategies. This course will assist social workers in identifying, assessing, and managing the clinical risks associated with suicidal behavior as well as expose them to the most recent empirical research advances in treating suicidal behavior.

Objectives

By the end of this workshop, fully engaged participants will be able to:

  1. Identify incidence and prevalence of various suicidal behaviors in demographic and diagnostic groups
  2. Explore ethical considerations and implications related to suicidality
  3. Gain knowledge of the significance of culture, race, and ethnic on suicidality 
  4. Gain knowledge of religious/spiritual influences on suicidality 
  5. Gain knowledge of risk, identification, and assessment of suicidal behaviors in children and adolescents 
  6. Understand some core evidence-based treatment interventions for suicidality (e.g., Crisis management, Psychopharmacology, CBT, DBT)

About the Instructor

Dr. Robin E. Gearing is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston and a Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He also has extensive experience practicing as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment service for more than twenty years. Dr. Gearing’s program of research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health service use and treatment interventions. His research examines and seeks to build on improving and family treatment engagement, adherence, and developing evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for youth with mental illness and their families. In addition to other forums, findings from Dr. Gearing’s research have appeared in over 50 peer-review journal publications.

  

Ethical Clinical Decision Making

Date: October 26, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

About the Course

The participant will be able to identify the areas one is to consider when making ethical/clinical decisions as well as utilize tools in making those decisions. Various ethical thought will guide the decision making and the use of your own case scenarios will help to bring the content to life. Participants involved in clinical decisions and/or ethical situations in the administrative/macro arena are encouraged to attend, so all aspects of social work can be examined.

Objectives

By the end of this course, fully engaged participants will be able to:

  • Identify the areas one is to consider when making ethical/clinical decisions.
  • Identify tools to assist in making ethical/clinical decisions.
  • Identify the various ethics that guide decision making.
  • Demonstrate ethical/clinical decision making through case scenarios.

About the Instructor

Cynthia F. Reibenstein, LCSW, ACSW, DCSW has over 27 years of experience in a variety of settings like schools, medical and mental health facilities and is highly experienced in supervision and social work consultation. She has developed effective presentations to assist colleagues, professionals, and the public in overcoming barriers that lead them to a more meaningful life. Currently, she teaches part-time at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and has a supervision consultation practice.
Cynthia also works with the elderly and with people with disabilities and serves on several boards that focus on education. Reibenstein and Associates is dedicated to ethical, quality service that helps individuals be motivated and inspired to develop their full potential.

 

Responding Clinically to Trauma Experienced by Families as a Result of Immigration Separation

Date: November 2, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

About the Course

This course addresses issues relating to systemic oppression and exclusion of immigrant populations.  It will provide training in trauma-informed assessment and clinical treatment of children and families affected by our country’s recent immigration policies. The intent of this course is to increase the capacity of participants to better meet the mental health needs of immigrant populations in the Houston area following mandated traumatic familial separations.

Objectives

By the end of this course, fully engaged participants will be able to:

  • Gain culturally sensitive proficiency in assessing for signs of trauma in parents and children who were separated due to immigration policies.
  • Acquire at least 2 skills to engage clinically with children and adults at different stages of their trauma and immigration status.
  • Learn to access a varied range of clinical skills, from crisis-intervention to body-based.
  • Create a toolbox of self-care strategies to manage vicarious trauma to respond in a present and clinically sound manner.

About the Instructor

Prior to establishing her private practice, Elizabeth Haberer’s clinical experience has taken place in a number of settings such as The Children’s Assessment Center, the Council on Recovery, the University of Pittsburg Medical Center’s Pediatric OCD IOP Program and the Menninger Clinic, where she spent several years working as a family therapist for young adults.  Her clinical specialties include trauma, personality disorders, and family dynamics.  Elizabeth is pursuing advanced training in psychoanalysis, is a clinical supervisor and has served as adjunct faculty at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work.

 

Fall 2018: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Date: November 16, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM 5:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Fee: $100

Free Parking in the stadium parking garage at the corner of Cullen Boulevard and Holman.

About the Course

Most social workers will encounter suicidal clients more than once in their careers. While suicide is the penultimate act we wish to avoid, practitioners must also intervene with non-fatal suicidal behaviors that occur with higher frequency. These include suicidal ideation or thoughts; suicidal verbalization, often in the form of suicide threats, intentional self-harm, and suicide attempts. Research on suicidal behavior now indicates that non-fatal suicidal behaviors are often most effectively reduced via systematic focus and specialized intervention strategies. This course will assist social workers in identifying, assessing, and managing the clinical risks associated with suicidal behavior as well as expose them to the most recent empirical research advances in treating suicidal behavior.

Objectives

By the end of this workshop, fully engaged participants will be able to:

1) Identify incidence and prevalence of various suicidal behaviors in demographic and diagnostic groups
2) Explore ethical considerations and implications related to suicidality
3) Gain knowledge of the significance of culture, race, and ethnicity on suicidality
4) Gain knowledge of religious/spiritual influences on suicidality
5) Gain knowledge of risk, identification, and assessment of suicidal behaviors in children and adolescents
6) Understand some core evidence-based treatment interventions for suicidality (e.g., Crisis management, Psychopharmacology, CBT, DBT)

About the Instructor

Dr. Robin E. Gearing is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston and a Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He also has extensive experience practicing as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment service for more than twenty years. Dr. Gearing’s program of research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health service use and treatment interventions. His research examines and seeks to build on improving and family treatment engagement, adherence, and developing evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for youth with mental illness and their families. In addition to other forums, findings from Dr. Gearing’s research have appeared in over 50 peer-review journal publications.

 

A Practical Guide to Creating Your Own Successful Private Counseling Practice 

Date: Friday, December 7, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM 12:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Fee: $75

Free Parking in the stadium parking garage at the corner of Cullen Boulevard and Holman.

Register:  Here

About the Course

Social workers often express interest in working in a private practice setting, intrigued by the flexible work schedule as well as the earning potential. Many social workers, however, are uncertain of how to enter into this area of social work practice. This course will outline the steps to develop a business model that has the greatest potential for clinical and financial success.

Objectives

Upon completing this course, participants will be able to:
  • Understand the logistical steps to becoming an independent provider of mental health services.
  • Understand how to bill insurance companies in order to receive financial reimbursement for services rendered.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of accepting insurance assignments.
  • Understand how to navigate ethical challenges unique to private practice.
  • Review the steps to become an in-network participant with insurance panels.

About the Instructor

Andrea Skoglund, LCSW received her bachelor’s degree in public relations from Marquette University. She completed her MSSW from the University of Texas at Austin and has worked at a variety of academic medical centers. She is a Board Approved Supervisor and has been writing examination items for the ASWB’s clinical licensure exam since 2012. In her own private practice, Andrea works with a variety of clients including adolescents, young adults, women, and couples across life’s entire spectrum.

 

January 2019: Identifying, Assessing and Treating Suicidal Behavior

Date: January 25, 2019

Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 pm

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Free Parking in the stadium parking garage at the corner of Cullen Boulevard and Holman.

Register:  Here

About the Course

Most social workers will encounter suicidal clients more than once in their careers. While suicide is the penultimate act we wish to avoid, practitioners must also intervene with non-fatal suicidal behaviors that occur with higher frequency. These include suicidal ideation or thoughts; suicidal verbalization, often in the form of suicide threats, intentional self-harm, and suicide attempts. Research on suicidal behavior now indicates that non-fatal suicidal behaviors are often most effectively reduced via systematic focus and specialized intervention strategies. This course will assist social workers in identifying, assessing, and managing the clinical risks associated with suicidal behavior as well as expose them to the most recent empirical research advances in treating suicidal behavior.

Objectives

By the end of this course, fully engaged participants will be able to:

  • Identify incidence and prevalence of various suicidal behaviors in demographic and diagnostic groups
  • Explore ethical considerations and implications related to suicidality
  • Gain knowledge of the significance of culture, race, and ethnicity on suicidality
  • Gain knowledge of religious/spiritual influences on suicidality
  • Gain knowledge of risk, identification, and assessment of suicidal behaviors in children and adolescents
  • Understand some core evidence-based treatment interventions for suicidality (e.g., Crisis management, Psychopharmacology, CBT, DBT)

About the Instructor

Dr. Robin E. Gearing is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston and a Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He also has extensive experience practicing as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment service for more than twenty years. Dr. Gearing’s program of research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health service use and treatment interventions. His research examines and seeks to build on improving and family treatment engagement, adherence, and developing evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for youth with mental illness and their families. In addition to other forums, findings from Dr. Gearing’s research have appeared in over 50 peer-review journal publications.

 

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