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Course Descriptions

Intermediate/Clinical Level Exam Prep- Part I & Part II

Adult Psychopathology and DSM-5-Assessment and Treatment of Internalizing Disorders: Depressive, Anxiety, Trauma, and Eating Disorders

Clinical Supervision in Social Work

Identifying and Responding to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Children

Adult Psychopathology and DSM-5-Assessment and Treatment of Externalizing Disorders (ADHD, Oppositional, Conduct, Personality, and Substance-Related Disorders)

Racial Micoraggressions and Their Effect on the Therapeutic Process

Addressing Ethical Challenges: Integrating a Trauma Perspective in Clinical Practice

Advanced Clinical Supervision in Social Work (Refresher Course)

A Practical Guide to Creating Your Own Successful Private Counseling Practice

Ethical Approach to Working with Transgender Clients

 

  • To register and pay by credit card, click here 

Intermediate/Clinical Level Exam Prep- Part I & Part II

Date: Part I, Friday, February 2, 2018

  Part II, Friday, February 9, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM (Both Days)

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $200 (Includes parking both days at the stadium parking garage only)
(Also includes a complimentary copy of the brand new NASW Code of Ethics)

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0296C

CEUs: 12 CEUs

About the Course

Part I
In this updated course, students are taught the necessary skills to successfully prepare for the licensing exam. Helpful tips will guide students toward concentrating their preparation in areas helpful to success. Handouts include practice test questions and answers that will help students develop confidence to take the exam.


Part II
In this revised format, students are taught the necessary skills to prepare for the DSM-5 section of the licensing exam. There are intensive reviews of major topics with particular attention to DSM-5. Handouts and practice tests for the LMSW, LMSW-AP, and LCSW exams are included. Students develop the necessary confidence to take the exam.

Objectives

Part I: Upon concluding this segment of the course, students will be able to:

  • List the values and standard areas in the most current edition of the NASW Code of Ethics.
  • List the primary concepts for at least 3 different theories of psychosocial development.
  • List at least 3 theoretical frameworks for direct social work practice with individuals, families, and groups.

 

Part II: Upon concluding this segment of the course, students will be able to:
  • Identify the diagnostic criteria for five different types of disorders including schizophrenia, Bipolar I and Bipolar II mood disorders and three different types of personality disorders.

About the Instructors

Patricia Taylor, Ph.D., LCSW is a licensed clinical social worker and approved Texas LCSW supervisor who has practiced in the Houston area and taught clinical courses at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work for the last 14 years. She is currently Curriculum Coordinator for the Child Welfare Education Project and adjunct faculty member at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. She presented numerous workshops for the Protective Services Training Institute of Texas and presented research by invitation at professional meetings. She is also highly experienced at teaching Intermediate/Clinical Level Exam Prep and has a very high pass rate among students taking this course. It is important that students take both parts of this course.

Adult Psychopathology and DSM-5-Assessment and Treatment of Internalizing Disorders: Depressive, Anxiety, Trauma, and Eating Disorders

Date: March 9, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW00305C

CEUs: 7 CEUs 

About the Course

The purpose of this course is to integrate knowledge of internalizing mental disorders (psychopathology) into clinical social work practice perspective. Social workers represent the majority of mental health professionals in direct practice in the US and consequently play a critically important role in the mental health field. Social workers view internalizing psychopathology and wellness within the broader context of a client’s personal and family history, as well as her or his current social and occupational environment, important life events, stressors, and her or his strengths and resources. In order to be optimally helpful to clients, a social worker needs to know how to best organize this information and how to link it to the principles, strategies and techniques that comprise interventions with proven efficacy. Social workers should know how to utilize techniques that comprise interventions in practice. Case formulation, including understanding DSM criteria and diagnoses, and appropriate evidence- based treatment is the centerpiece of this course. An individualized case formulation is a tool to link assessment, treatment, and aftercare, and to link research and practice. A formulation is a way to organize and structure individual clinical information such that meaningful goals can be established and optimal intervention planned. The case formulation integrates the client’s current symptoms, impairments, and strengths in the context of important life events and chronic stressors, family and community, and the client’s own past history.

Objectives

Students who are fully engaged and fully participate in this class will be able to:

  • Learn and apply the diagnostic criteria for the most common adult internalizing mental disorders using the DSM-5.
  • Know how to develop an individualized case formulation for adults with internalizing mental disorders.
  • Be familiar with commonly used assessment instruments for adults, and be familiar with evidence-based interventions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Motivational Interviewing (MI) for adults.

About the Instructors

Robin E. Gearing, Ph.D., LCSW is Associate Professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He also has extensive experience practicing as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment service for more than 20 years. Dr. Gearing’s program of research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health service use and treatment interventions. His researchexamines and seeks to build on improving family treatment engagement, adherence, and developing evidence-based psychosocial treatment interventions for youth with mental illness and their families. Findings from Dr. Gearings research have appeared in over 50 peer-reviewed journal publications.

Clinical Supervision in Social Work

Date: Thursday & Friday, March 22-23 and April 12-13, 2018

Time: 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM, all 4 days (1-hour lunch)

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work – Multipurpose Room

Course Fee: $600 (Early Bird Registration) $650 (Registration after March 8, 2018)

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0299C

CEUs: 40 CEUs including 12 Ethics CEUs

About the Course

This 40-hour course is designed for Licensed Clinical Social Workers who are interested in creating a highly ethical supervision practice and advancing their knowledge, skill, and experience in clinical social work supervision to fulfill licensing requirements to be an approved LCSW supervisor (as set forth by the Texas State Board of Social Worker Examiners 781.102). This course will be delivered in 28 hours of face-to face classroom work and in 12 hours of supervised, independent, structured work designed for course preparation, exploration, reflection, and integration of content. Please note: An LCSW must have two years  of practice experience prior to applying to be a Board Approved Supervisor. The four-day course will consist of five modules and twelve hours of independent work to be completed throughout the course period. Independent work consists of an in-depth review of the TSBSWE rules and regulations regarding LCSW clinical supervision, exploration of supervisory fit and style, assigned readings, and development of essential supervisory forms.

Objectives

This highly interactive and experiential course is grounded in a strong ethical framework to allow for the most effective clinical supervision experience. Actively engaging in connecting course content with ethics, the course covers five major modules:

  • Key Elements of Clinical Social Work Supervision:
    Creating and Sustaining an Effective and Ethical Supervisory Relationship
  • Process and Phases of Clinical Social Work Supervision:
    Promoting Growth, Development, and Self-Care
  • Supervisory Models and Methods:
    Developing Conceptual Knowledge of Models, Methods, and Techniques
  • Critical Issues in Clinical Social Work Supervision:
    Managing Ethical and Clinical Challenges in the Supervisory Relationship
  • Cultural Competence, Ethical Decision Making, Ethics and Legal Issues:
    Maintaining an Ethical Practice of Clinical Supervision

Participants will receive a 40-hour certificate of completion for the course (that includes 12 hours of ethics training) if they have attended all 28 hours of face-to-face classes and completed all 12 hours of independent work. Please note: Additional fees will apply if any  make-up assignments are required, and this will likely delay receipt of the certificate of  course completion.

About the Instructors

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, ACSW, DCSW,  Kay G. Schiller, LCSW, ACSW, DCSW,  Patricia Taylor, Ph.D., LCSW,  Shubhra Endley, LCSW, and  Ada Cheung, Ph.D., LCSW are clinical social work practitioners, approved LCSW supervisors with extensive experience in providing clinical supervision to social workers, and have served as Faculty and Adjunct Faculty at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work.

Identifying and Responding to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Children 

Date: Monday April 16, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location:Children’s Protective Services, 2525 Murworth, Houston, Texas

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0307C

CEUs: 3 CEUs

About the Course

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders is an umbrella term referring to a range of effects that can occur during pregnancy, from alcohol-related birth disorders to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). Alcohol can affect any organ or system of fetal development, thereby potentially resulting in a variety of lifetime, costly comorbid conditions. Human services professionals play an integral role in both the prevention of FASD and in helping identify youth with FASD, so proper services can be provided. This course will describe FASD, strategies for the prevention of FASD and information on the identification, referral and intervention for youth with FASD.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the range of effects that can occur from and alcohol-exposed pregnancy. 2. Articulate some evidence-based approaches for reducing the risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancy. 3. Describe ways in which to identify youth who may have been affected by and alcohol-exposed pregnancy. 4. Identify the process of identifying FASD, as well as a variety of evidence-based interventions and strategies to support youth with FASD./p>

  1. Describe the range of effects that can occur from and alcohol-exposed pregnancy.
  2. Articulate some evidence-based approaches for reducing the risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancy.
  3. Describe ways in which to identify youth who may have been affected by and alcohol-exposed pregnancy.
  4. Identify the process of identifying FASD, as well as a variety of evidence-based interventions and strategies to support youth with FASD.

About the Instructors

Danielle Parrish, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Graduate College of Social Work. Her research focuses on the prevention of alcohol and other substance-exposed pregnancies among adolescent and adult women of childbearing age, and the dissemination of evidence-based practice. She has also written a number of articles and book chapters focused on the prevention of FASD, as well as the identification, referral and intervention with youth with FASD. Dr. Parrish worked previously as a mental health clinician for the Fresno County Mental Health Department of Children and Family Services in Juvenile Hall Crisis Intervention, Infant Mental Health and Children’s Outpatient Mental Health for Court Referred CPS services. Dr. Parrish serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Social Work Education, as well as in national service roles with the Society for Social Work and Research and the Council on Social Work Education.

Alicia Kowalchuk is Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine in Family and Community Medicine. She is a board certified family physician in Houston. Dr. Kowalchuk received her medical degree from New York College of Osteopathic Medicine and did her residency at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Kowalchuk is an expert in the field of alcohol-exposed pregnancies.

Adult Psychopathology and DSM-5-Assessment and Treatment of Externalizing Disorders (ADHD, Oppositional, Conduct, Personality, and Substance-Related Disorders)

Date: Friday, April 20, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $100

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0305C

CEUs: 7 CEUs 

About the Course

The purpose of this course is to integrate knowledge of externalizing mental disorders (psychopathology) into clinical social work practice. Social workers represent the majority of mental health professionals in direct practice in the US and play a critically important role in the mental health field. Social workers view externalizing psychopathology and wellness within the broader context of a client's personal and family history, as well as in her or his current social and occupational environment, important life events, stressors, and her or his strengths and resources. In order to be optimally helpful to clients, a social worker needs to know how to best organize this information and how to link it to the principles, strategies and techniques that comprise interventions with proven efficacy. Social workers should know how to utilize efficacious interventions in practice. Case formulation, including understanding DSM criteria and diagnoses, and appropriate evidence-based treatment is the centerpiece of the course. An individualized case formulation is a tool to link assessment, treatment, and aftercare, as well as to link research and practice. A formulation is a way to organize and structure individual clinical information such that meaningful goals can be established and optimal intervention planned. The case formulation integrates the client's current symptoms, impairments, and strengths in the context of important life events and chronic stressors, family and community, and the client's own past history.

Objectives

Students who are fully engaged and fully participate in this class will be able to:

  • Learn to apply the diagnostic criteria for the most common adult externalizing mental disorders using the DSM 5.
  • Know how to develop an individualized case formulation for adults with externalizing mental disorders
  • Be familiar with commonly used assessment instruments and evidence based interventions for adults, like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Motivational Interviewing (MI).

About the Instructors

Dr. Robin E. Gearing is an Associate Professor at the University of Houston and a Clinical Associate Professor at UT Health McGovern Medical School Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He has over 20 years of experience as a clinical social worker in psychosocial and mental health treatment. Dr. Gearing’s research concentrates in the areas of adolescent mental health and treatment interventions. His research examines and builds on improving family engagement and treatment. His work also adheres to and develops evidence-based psychosocial treatment for youth with mental illness and their families. Articles with Dr. Gearing’s research have appeared in over 50 peer-reviewed journal publications.

Racial Microaggressions and Their Effect on the Therapeutic Process

Date: Friday, April 6, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 NOON

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0306C

CEUs: 3 CEUs 

About the Course

Racial Microaggressions are brief and ordinary verbal, behavioral, or environmental incidents, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial insults towards people of color. Examples are making statements such as “When I look at you, I don’t see color,” and telling someone of a different race that they “speak good English.”

Employing the ground-breaking work of Dr. Derald Sue as a framework, this interactive 3-hour session will provide and overview of the various types of racial microaggressions and how they can affect the therapeutic process. In addition to learning skills to become more culturally competent, participants will also be challenged to analyze their own racial identity and their feelings toward people of other racial groups.

Objectives

Upon concluding this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the three major forms of racial microaggressions.
  • Identify common dilemmas in responding to microaggressions.
  • Describe examples of racial microaggressions in the therapeutic process and their effect on the therapeutic relationship.
  • Analyze personal racial identity and feelings towards other racial groups.
  • Learn strategies to increase cultural competency.

About the Instructors

Kamilah Thomas, LCSW, has more than 12 years of experience working with adolescents and adults who have had difficulty with symptoms of stress, depression, anxiety, grief, trauma, relationship issues, and serious mental illness. She has a passion for destigmatizing mental illness in the community. She has worked with youth in the foster care and juvenile justice systems, with at-risk adolescents in a residential treatment center, parents in parenting classes, clients in individual and group therapy sessions as well as with adolescents and adults in inpatient and outpatient mental health facilities. Kamilah is currently employed as a therapist at Cy-Hope Counseling in Cypress, Texas.

 

Addressing Ethical Challenges: Integrating a Trauma Perspective in Clinical Practice

Date: Thursday, April 26 & Friday, April 27, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Location: Bo’s Place 10500 Buffalo Speedway, Houston, TX 77054

Course Fee: $250 (Includes the cost of both days)

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0302C

CEUs: 12 CEUs including 3 Ethics CEUs

About the Course

In the last decade, trauma has gained increasing attention in the United States as it relates to diverse populations. Ethical standards call for clinicians to have working knowledge and skill about trauma and its potential for long-lasting impact. This highly interactive, intensive two-day course, will provide participants with a valuable framework for understanding contemporary research about trauma, its manifestations, types, neurobiological aspects, and post-traumatic growth. Evidence based practices for clinical assessment and interventions with trauma will be addressed. Using a problem-based learning approach, participants will have an opportunity to integrate a trauma perspective in clinical practice through case vignettes and experiential exercises.

Objectives

Students who are fully engaged and participate in this class will be able to:

  • Identify and address key ethical challenges related to working with trauma in clinical practice.
  • Develop a contemporary framework for understanding adverse childhood experiences, trauma, trauma types, manifestations, influencing factors, cultural influences, neurobiological aspects, post-traumatic growth, and resiliency.
  • Formulate a clinical approach for assessment of trauma across diverse practice settings.
  • Develop a trauma-informed practice approach and examine evidence-based practice treatment with various populations.
  • Integrate a trauma perspective in clinical practice

About the Instructors

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, ACSW, DCSW is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 35 years of clinical practice and consultation experience. Her primary areas of clinical expertise include trauma and grief. She is a retired Clinical Professor from the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work.

Patricia Taylor, Ph.D., LCSW is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with 30 years of clinical practice and consultation experience in Houston and Longview, Texas. She has served as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. In the spring of 2011, Sandra A. Lopez and Patricia Taylor also co-developed and taught the first Trauma and Social Work Practice course at the UHGCSW. They both have had extensive training in problem-based teaching of a national gold standard training curriculum called “Core Concepts of Childhood and Adolescent Trauma.” They have completed the two-day training in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TFCBT).

Advanced Clinical Supervision in Social Work (Refresher Course)

Date: Thursday, May 3, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0301C

CEUs: 3 CEUs

About the Course

Using the ground-breaking work of Stephen R. Covey (Seven Habits of Highly Effective People) as a framework, this 3-hour session will explore seven areas of significance to clinical social work supervisors. This highly interactive session will briefly define the significance of areas in the process of supervision, allow for individual participant’s assessment of their strengths and limitations, and ultimately identify specific strategies for improving one’s effectiveness as an ethically competent clinical social supervisor. This session is designed for social workers who have met the earlier requirements of a 40-hour course and who now want to meet the established requirements for advanced clinical supervisor training as set forth by the Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners.

Objectives

Students who are fully engaged and participate in this class will be able to:

  • Develop a framework for understanding seven key areas related to the process and practice of clinical supervision in social work.
  • Assess their strengths and limitations around these seven established areas.
  • Identify specific strategies for improving one’s effectiveness as an ethically competent clinical supervisor.

About the Instructors

Sandra A. Lopez, LCSW, ACSW, DCSW is a retired clinical professor from the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and maintains a clinical and consulting practice in Houston. She has over 34 years of social work experience and has provided supervision and consultation to numerous social workers pursuing their LCSW.

A Practical Guide to Creating Your Own Successful Private Counseling Practice

Date: Friday, May 4, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

Course Number: 17SSW0303C

About the Course

Social workers often express interest in working in a private practice setting, intrigued by the flexible work schedule as well as the earning potential. Many social workers, however, are uncertain of how to enter into this area of social work practice. This course will outline the steps to develop a business model that has the greatest potential for clinical and financial success.

Objectives

Upon completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the logistical steps to become an independent provider of mental health services.
  • Understand how to bill the insurance companies in order to receive financial reimbursement for services rendered.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of accepting insurance assignments.
  • Understand how to navigate ethical challenges unique to private practice.
  • Review the steps to become an in-network participant with insurance panels.

About the Instructors

Andrea received her bachelor’s degree in public relations from Marquette University. She completed her MSSW from the University of Texas at Austin and has worked at a variety of academic medical centers. She is a Board Approved Supervisor, and has been writing examination items for the ASWB’s clinical licensure exam since 2012. In her own private practice, Andrea works with a variety of clients including adolescent and young adults as well as with women and couples across life’s entire spectrum.

Ethical Approach to Working with Transgender Clients

Date: Friday, May 11, 2018

Time: 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location: University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work

Course Fee: $75

Register:  Here

Course Number: 18SSW0308C

About the Course

This course will examine the current NASW Code of Ethics concerning gender identity and gender expression. Terminology related to transgender populations will be discussed. The course will help professionals working with transgender clients better engage transgender individuals in accessing mental health services and in ethically engaging them in therapy with the goal of better therapeutic outcomes.

Objectives

Upon completing this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Gain knowledge of terminology related to transsexual and gender non-conforming individuals for the purpose of providing more empathic service to this population and, concomitantly, helping them to achieve better service outcomes.
  2. Get an understanding of the New NASW Code of Ethics related to gender identity and expression.
  3. Receive skills to engage transgender individuals and gender non-conforming individuals in accessing mental health services and achieving better mental health outcomes.
  4. Receive skills to understand and engage with foster care agencies.

About the Instructors

A fascinating and strong advocate for transgender individuals, Josephine Tittsworth is a graduate of the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work and a transgender individual. She is a Vietnam Era veteran and a retired IBM employee with 31 years of mainframe computer repair and maintenance experience. She has published numerous articles in academic journals focusing on transgender issues.

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