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Current Graduate Students

Name

Fields / 
Dissertation topic

Advisors

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Quentin Adams

adamsquentin15@yahoo.com

Quentin Adams is a doctoral candidate specializing in early modern European history, with a focus on the Church of England in the seventeenth-century. His dissertation, Laudianism in the Parish: The Experience of Laudianism in the Archdeaconry of Nottingham, examines the impact of policies introduced in the 1630s by Archbishop Richard Neile of York in tandem with Archbishop of Canterbury William Laud. 

It argues for the need to reconceptualize Laudianism’s local effects in terms of a spectrum of choices and experiences, and complicates the notion that Laudianism was a coherent, widely disruptive force at the parish level. Also interested in medieval history, Quentin has produced an episode on the Medieval Papacy for the French History Podcast, and is currently working on an episode concerning the Protestant Reformation. Quentin received a B.A. in history from the University of Texas at Austin in 2013."

Catherine Patterson

Sally Vaughn

Todd Romero

 

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Allison R. Anderson

Arander6@cougarnet.uh.edu 

Allison R. Anderson is a first year PhD student at the University of Houston where she studies U.S. history and public history. Her research focuses on U.S. political realignment in the twentieth century and New Conservatism. She received a B.A. in U.S. History Pre-Law and Political Science from Western Illinois University in 2019.

 

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Laura Bernal

Laura.Bernal53@gmail.com

oral history, labor history, public history, environmental history

Brownwood: Remembering Baytown's Hidden Neighborhood (MA Thesis)

Monica Perales

Eric Boutin-Bloomberg

Eric Boutin-Bloomberg

enboutin-bloomberg@uh.edu

Website

Field(s): Canadian-American Borderlands, Whiteness Studies, Race and Ethnicity
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Eric Boutin-Bloomberg is a Ph.D. candidate focusing on the Canadian-American borderlands in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  He received a B.A. in history from the University of Houston in 2015. His dissertation, “British Imperialists and Reluctant Americans: The Transnational Colonization of the Canadian-American Borderlands, 1776-1900,” examines the ways in which agents of colonization utilized whiteness as a way to link 

white British subjects and white Americans in colonization schemes from Nova Scotia to the northern plains/prairies. This project also explores how British colonists used the border, and those on the other side, to justify their colonies. Rejecting the idea that Canadian and American history are inherently opposed, with the former defined by “peace, order, and good government” and the latter by violent, chaotic expansionism, “British Imperialists and Reluctant Americans” argues that both histories of colonization were similarly white supremacist and dependent on racism, anti-Blackness, and the violent dispossession of Indigenous lands.

Mark Goldberg

 

 

 

 

Heather Butina-Sutton

hbutina-sutton@uh.edu

Atlantic World, Brazil, women and gender, religion, slavery

Philip Howard

 

Ramiro Contreras

rcontreras5@uh.edu

Website

20th Century U.S., Mexican American Agency, Houston

H-Town Mexicanas: Ethnic Mexican Women in Houston From 1900-1960

Guadalupe San Miguel

Nancy Young

Cynthia Orozco

Thomas Doser

Thomas Doser

tcdoser@uh.edu

Modern U.S., urban/suburban history, environmental history, race and ethnicity, immigration, public history

 

Martin Melosi

Monica Perales

 

 

Lindsay Drane

Lindsay Drane

lndrane@uh.edu

Website

United States, 20th Century Political History, Food Studies, Women and Gender History, Oral History

Too Poor To Eat: A Socio-Political History of Food Stamps in the United States, 1964-1996

Nancy Beck Young

Leandra Zarnow

Monica Perales

James Schafer

 

Brian Evans

 

Jonathan Fairchild

jrfairchild@uh.edu

Website

Native American Studies, 19th century U.S., Borderlands, Race and Ethnicity, Oral History

They Intend to Conduct Us Out of Their Country: The Choctaw Diaspora

Todd Romero

Raúl Ramos

Mark Goldberg

Matthew Finnie

Matthew Thomas Finnie

mtfinnie@uh.edu

Website

Matthew Thomas Finnie is a doctoral candidate who studies the religious and environmental history of the ancient Mediterranean and Pre-Islamic Africa. Having attended a summer seminar at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, he is currently writing his doctoral dissertation, “The Dry Bones Speak: Hero Cult and the Staging of Heroes in Ancient Athens” to demonstrate how Athenians identified with the heroes of the Acropolis through both cultic practice and dramatic performance in the fifth century BCE.

A graduate of St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, he explored how climatic cooling and desertification contributed to the various environmental, economic, and political factors in the decline of the Roman Empire in his undergraduate thesis, “The Underlying Current: Climate Change and the Fall of Rome.” As a scholar of world history pedagogy and theory, he seeks to reorient the study of the premodern world to focus on transcontinental and global trends that transcend the borders of temporal and geographical periodization.

Frank Holt

Kristina Neumann

Kairn Klieman

Casey Dué Hackney

Gary Girodggirod@uh.edu

Gary Girod is finishing the last few chapters of his dissertation on the development of mass domestic surveillance in WWI Britain and France. He received his B.A. in History and French from Chapman University. His paper "The women who make the guns: the munitionettes in Glasgow and Paris and their lack of interaction with the far-left agitators" was published in Labor History

He is the founder and host of The French History Podcast, an interdisciplinary public history project that hosts world-class scholars discussing issues of French history. 

Fields: Modern Britain, Modern France, labor history, women and gender, social history, WWI

Sarah Fishman

Alexey Golubev

Nancy Young

 

 

 

Kimberly R. Goodling

 

Francesca Guerri

 

Patrick Higgins

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Paula Davis Hoffman

pauladhoffman@gmail.com

Miami's Cuban-exile community

Rise of the Chongas: How Loud and Lipsticked Cubanitas Burned Their Community’s Racial, Sexual, and Class-Based Pedestal to the Ground

Monica Perales

Philip Howard

Derek Ide

Derek Ide

daide@uh.edu

Website

Modern Arab World, Palestine, Egypt, transnational political movements

 

Abdel Razzaq Takriti

 

 

 

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Caitlyn Jones

caitlynmjones01@gmail.com

Website

 

 

Public History, Women and Gender History, 20th century U.S. History, Media History Nancy Beck Young

 

 

Priscilla JudsonWallace

pjudsonwallace@uh.edu 

Field(s): Transnational History and African American Studies

Dissertation Topic: The global impact of Black Radical Tradition on social and political movements

Priscilla JudsonWallace is currently a second year doctoral candidate focusing on Transnational History and African American Studies.  She received her BA from the University of  

Texas at El Paso in History. Her research interest explores the global impact of Black Radical Tradition on social and political  movements. She analyzes the visions, philosophies, politics, and social alliances of black radical intellectuals and activists who proposed diverse ways out of the constrictions of segregation and discrimination, particularly in North America and the Caribbean Islands. 

David McNally

 

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Fadi Kafeety

FKafeety@uh.edu

Website

Position: Administrative Coordinator, The Arab-American Educational Foundation Center for Arab Studies

Revolutions, Colonialism/ Imperialism, Modern Middle East (Palestine, Arabian Gulf and Peninsula), Political Economy, Historical Sociology, Marxist Theory

Dissertation Topic: "The History of the South Yemeni Revolution, 1963-1969"

 

Abdel Razzaq Takriti

Alex La Rotta

Alex La Rotta

alarotta@uh.edu

Website

Modern U.S., cultural, ethno-racial, music, public history

Young, Gifted, and Brown: The History of San Antonio's West Side Sound

Monica Perales and Mark Goldberg (co-advisors)

Raúl Ramos

Oliver Wang

Gary Hartman

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Karla A. Lira

kalira@uh.edu

Website

Fields: Latinx, Sports, Race and Ethnicity, 20th Century, Public History

Karla A. Lira is a Doctoral Candidate focusing on the intersections of Latinx and Black college athletes during the latter part of Jim Crow. Lira's current project, True We'll Ever Be, sheds light on the social relations Latinx and Black players had in the city of Houston and the University of Houston Basketball Program through oral interviews.

Mark Goldberg

 

Taylor Mankin

 

Eric McDonald

ejmcdonald2@uh.edu

Atlantic World, Slavery, Violence, early-modern Caribbean

Violent Identities: Elite Masculinity and Anglo-American Slavery in Seventeenth Century Barbados

Todd Romero

Catherine Patterson

Matthew Clavin

 

Ela Miljkovic

Ela Miljkovic

emiljkovic@uh.edu

Latin America, Mexico, environmental history, urban studies, history of technology and science, cultural history, oral history

The Air Particles We Breathe: The Rise of Polluted Mexico City and its Transborder Effects

John Hart

Kristin Wintersteen

Monica Perales

Emily Wakild

 

Curtis C. Mooney

ccmooney@uh.edu

Website

U. S. History, History of Medicine

From Moral to Immoral Treatment: The Failure to Fund the Treatment for the Seriously Mentally Ill in Texas and the Nation 1861-2018

Hannah Decker

James Schafer

Mallory Neil

Mallory Neil

mneil@uh.edu

Great Britain, Edwardian society, Franco-British relations, world's fairs, women and gender

Exhibiting 1908: Politics and Society of Twentieth-Century Britain at the Franco-British Exhibition

Karl Ittman

Sarah Fishman

Todd Romero

 

 

Emiliano Orozco

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Xandria Outing

xandria.outing@gmail.com

modern Europe, modern England, royal familes, women's history

Sarah Fishman

 

Alex Paul

Alex Paul

aypaul@uh.edu

After serving in the British Army as an infantry soldier, Alex Paul began his studies at Lone Star College in Houston. He completed his BA in History at the University of Houston and is currently a doctoral candidate. Alex’s research explores how race, ethnicity, masculinity, American identity, and claims to whiteness and citizenship rights intersect with military service. Focusing on the US & WWI, his research analyzes relationships 

between ethnic communities, wartime authorities, foreign-born soldiers, and the War Department. He recently presented his research at The Many Faces of War V: Veterans and History Conference and at the 2020 Society for Military History Annual Conference. He is currently working toward completing his dissertation: “Becoming American: Ethnic Soldiers in the U.S. Army during the First World War.”

Dr. Jimmy Schafer

Dr. Mark Goldberg

Dr. Leandra Zarnow

 

 

 

 

Timothy Quevillon

trquevillon@uh.edu

Modern U.S., race/ethnicity/immigration, American Jewish history, Israel/Palestine

“Jabotinsky and Postcolonial Identity in Howard Beach and Houston: The Kahana Family and Diverging Applications of Revisionist Zionism to the American Racial Struggles of the 1960s”

Mark Goldberg/Leandra Zarnow

Abdel Razzaq Takriti

Tony Michels

 

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Allison Sáenz

ansaenz@uh.edu

Field(s): Central American Studies, Immigration History, Public History
 

 

Allison Sáenz graduated from the University of Texas of San Antonio in 2017 with a BA in history. She is currently a third-year doctoral student at the University of Houston where her research interests include Latinx, immigration, and public history. Her dissertation explores the settlement, adaptation, and contributions of U.S. Central Americans. It is tentatively titled, "Being a U.S. Central American: Migration, Culture, and Ethnicity in Houston Post-1965." Through the Smithsonian Latino Museum Studies Program, Allison served 

as a team member  for the Latino Political History Initiative at the National Museum of American History. As a public historian, she has also contributed to "Latino cARTographies: Mapping the Past, Present, and Future of Houston Latino Art," a digital project that seeks to highlight Latinx art in the city. Additionally, Allison is a recipient of the University of Houston's Center for Mexican American Studies 2020-2021 Graduate Fellowship. She is passionate about creating academic scholarship, inside and outside of the classroom, that keeps the voice of the people at the heart of storytelling. 

Monica Perales

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Bryan Salazar

bryan9230@gmail.com

 

 

 

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Tara Sewell-Lasater

tlsewell@uh.edu

Website

Ptolemaic Egypt, queens, and numismatics; Greco-Roman World; gender in Antiquity

Becoming Kleopatra: Ptolemaic Royal Marriage, Incest, and the Path to Female Rule

Frank Holt

Kristina Neumann

Francesca Behr

Elizabeth Carney

 

Patrick Sheffield

pjsheffield@uh.edu

Modern Britain, Modern Europe, technological and environmental history, urban studies, business history

Imperial Oil and Suburban Science: The Sunbury Research Station and the growth of high-tech industry in the Thames Valley, 1917-1967

Karl Ittman

Martin Melosi

Sarah Fishman

Tyler Priest

Timothy Vale

Timothy Vale

tevale73@gmail.com

20th-century U.S., history of American medicine, LGBT history

Crimson Legacy: AIDS Patients and Gay Male Sexuality in America Since 1980 (title still in progress)

James Schafer

Eric Walther

Leandra Zarnow

 

Darah Vann

Darah Vann

dpvann@uh.edu

Women, Gender, and Sexuality; Ancient Greece, Roman Republic, Late Antiquity

Rape and Imperialism: Rome's Violent Conquest of Land and Bodies

Frank Holt

Kristina Neumann

 

 

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Seth Whitty

Srwhitty@uh.edu 

 

 

 

 

 

Slavery in the United States, Revolutions and Revolts in the 18th and 19th centuries, the Atlantic World

 

Matthew Clavin

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Alberto Wilson III

alberto.wilson3@gmail.com

Website

 Alberto Wilson III is a PhD candidate in the History Department at the University of Houston. His dissertation, “Pan American Cities: Sunbelt Development and Mexican Community Formation in El Paso and Ciudad Juárez, 1945-1994,” examines the identities, encounters, and solidarities that emerged after the Second World War in those cities. Specifically, 

it tells the story of how juarenses and El Pasoans, Anglos and racial minorities, Mexicans and Mexican Americans made use of shared space and turned bifurcation into exploit, enjoyment, and entropy. Alberto is currently an IUPLR/UIC Mellon fellow, and was a Fulbright García Robles fellow in 2018/20 in Ciudad Juárez where he conducted archival research and oral history fieldwork on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Monica Perales

Raúl Ramos

Leandra Zarnow