Difference between revisions of "Cases of Interest"

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Revision as of 06:08, 13 June 2011

This page will be segmented when it gets too long. Add information by clicking on "edit" above. Items should begin with term (if available) and year together with a letter to allow for distinguishing subsequent documents in the same year and term. The designation should be in bold. Thus an entry will appear as H1285 A:. Text thereafter should indicate what the document concerns. The link to the document should be a copied and pasted full web address (http:// . . .) surrounded by single brackets ( [ ] ). Leave a line between entries. The 25-year segments begin with a vertical bar and end with a vertical bar minus. Avoid other more complex codes. If you want to append a translation, provide a completely unique address surrounded by double brackets: Dartmouth Docs H1275 A Tr. Such an address indicates sector and year, the A indicates it is the first document entered for that year and term, the Tr indicates it is a translation. That will constitute a unique address. DO NOT attempt to re-order documents within a term to achieve a perfect chronology, since it will invalidate other references to re-named documents. A document written in Notepad will copy into the site without any complicating code. Avoid more complicated coding. Check your entry before saving by clicking on "show preview below (return here by using the back arrow); before leaving the document, remember to save the page.


ENTER ON THIS PAGE ONLY CASES THAT ARE SURPRISING, VERY UNUSUAL, OR EXTREMELY GOOD EXAMPLES OF PHENOMENA THAT DO NOT HAVE THEIR OWN THEME ELSEWHERE. BEFORE ENTERING ANYTHING HERE, ASK YOURSELF IF THERE ARE A HUNDRED SCHOLARS WHO WOULD NEED THIS REFERENCE

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H1315 A: Relevant to scienter: Robert Pilat & Cristina his wife v. Benedict le Chapman de Buntingford. Without vi et armis: why he near the plaintiff's house on the royal highway untied a certain dog known to bite men and customarily tied up, so that the dog attacked Cristina. Note that this was a positive doing (he untied) instead of an inadvertent escape, but also that it did not have vi et armis. [1]

T1315 A: Robert de Swalclyve v. Joan Marmyon & Manswer Marmyon together with Thomas le Tanour of Lincoln and John de Morby. Trespass breach of close and taking of grain. Joan pleaded that Robert de Chame son of Thomas de Chame citizen of Lincoln had held a messuage and a contiguous piece of land. He granted the messuage to Master Robert Marmyon rector of Falstow together with the buildings thereon with clear lights entering without obstruction through the windows (evidenced by charter). That Robert Marmyon by custom of Lincoln devised to Joan. Robert de Chame seven years later granted the contiguous piece of land to Robert de Swalcliff. He built a wall in front of Joan's windows; Joan destroyed that wall as she was entitled to do. The plaintiff argued his right to build walls on his own land. Issue of law adjourned then repleatedly. [2]

M1317 A:Order to the justices to do justice regardless of any writs under the great or privy seal. [3]

T1318 A: William de Thorpe clerk of court v. Thomas Makerel chandler and John his brother: trespass for assault and throwing urine on the plaintiff at Fleetstreet on his way to court. Thomas convicted at damages of 100s. [4]

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