GRADUATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW - University of Houston
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EARTH & ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES (EAS)

GRADUATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Table of Contents

1. Application Process

1.1 Admissions Process and Criteria
1.1.1 Masters Degree
1.1.2 Doctoral Degree
1.2 Application Deadlines
1.3 Graduate Student Support
1.3.1 General Guidelines
1.3.2 Teaching Assistantships
1.3.3 Research Assistantships
1.3.4 Internships and Industry Support
1.3.5 Fellowships and Scholarships

2. Masters Degree Programs

2.1 Background Requirements
2.1.1 M.S. in Geology
2.1.2 M.S. in Geophysics
2.1.3 M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences
2.2 M.S. Thesis Option Requirements
2.2.1 M.S. Thesis Option
2.2.1.1 Thesis Advisor/Committee
2.2.1.2 Thesis Proposal
2.2.1.3 Thesis Defense
2.2.1.4 Course Work
2.3 M.S. Non­Thesis Option Requirements
2.3.1 M.S. Non­Thesis Option
2.3.2 Course Work

3. Doctoral Degree Programs

3.1 Program Requirements
3.2 Sequence and Timing
3.2.1 Research Advisor/Research Committee
3.2.2 Candidacy
3.2.3 Dissertation Proposal
3.2.4 Dissertation Defense

4. GRADUATE ADVISOR CONTACT INFORMATION

Information on the Professional Masters Program can be found HERE . The department also offers specialized educational opportunities through Hydrogeology, GIS certification, and Petroleum Short courses.

1. APPLICATION PROCESS

1.1 Admissions Process and Criteria

1.1.1 Masters Degrees

The Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences offers a wide range of courses leading to the Degree of M.S. in Geology, M.S. in Geophysics, and M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences. Students are admitted to the masters programs on a competitive basis. At a minimum, an applicant to the masters program must have earned a Bachelor's Degree or its equivalent (See section 2.1). Applicants to the program will be evaluated based upon their Grade Point Average (GPA), Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores for exams taken in the last 5 years, and letters of recommendation that address the applicant’s ability to succeed in our graduate program. A GPA of 3.0 or better in the last 60 hours of course work and commensurate scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing sections of the GRE are minimal requirements to be considered for admission. All non‐native English‐speaking international students must take the TOEFL or the IELTS examination and receive scores of at least 79 or 6.5, respectively. In addition, the University requires scores in the writing component of these tests of at least 20 for the TOEFL and 6.5 for the IELTS even if the total score meets the minimum eligibility requirements. It is the policy of the EAS department to deny entrance of applicants to the thesis‐based M.S. program if a faculty advisor has not agreed to supervise their thesis research; this is not required to non‐thesis M.S. student applicants. This policy is in place to ensure that all admitted thesis-based M.S. students make adequate and efficient progress toward their degree from the start of their graduate degree plan. M.S. students wishing to pursue a Ph.D. at the University of Houston after defending their thesis must apply to the Ph.D. program as described below.

1.1.2 Doctoral Degrees

Students are admitted to the doctoral programs on a competitive basis. At a minimum, an applicant to the doctoral program will have earned a Master’s degree or have completed 30 semester hours of graduate credit, and submitted scores from the General GRE examination (verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing). All non‐native English‐speaking international students must take the TOEFL or the IELTS examination and receive scores of at least 79 or 6.5, respectively. In addition, the University requires scores in the writing component of these tests of at least 20 for the TOEFL and 6.5 for the IELTS even if the total score meets the minimum eligibility requirements. Students with a Bachelor’s degree can apply directly to the Ph.D. program, though they must successfully complete thirty (30) semester credit hours in addition to the credit requirements for the Ph.D. degree (54 credit hours total; see details below). The GRE scores submitted must be from exam(s) taken in the last 5 years. The graduate advisors in geology, geophysics, and atmospheric science and the department chair will evaluate the credentials of each applicant for the Ph.D. program, considering a broad range of criteria, including:
  1. Content of undergraduate, and if applicable, graduate programs and grades earned, particularly in the areas of Geosciences, Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry.
  2. Letters of recommendation from three (3) individuals (preferably faculty members), who are able to judge the candidate’s academic abilities and potential for scholarly research.
  3. Scores earned on the General GRE test (and TOEFL test, where applicable).
  4. Scientific, professional, and technical publications including a Master’s Thesis (if applicable).
It is the policy of the EAS department to deny entrance of applicants to the doctoral program if a faculty advisor has not agreed to supervise their dissertation project. This policy is in place to ensure that all admitted Ph.D. students make adequate and efficient progress toward their degree from the start of their graduate degree plan.

1.2 Application Deadlines (Excluding the Professional Program)

• Fall Semester Admissions: January 5.

All applicants for regular M.S. and Ph.D. programs should submit all required application materials by the deadline stated above.

To apply, follow the instructions at:
http://www.uh.edu/graduate­school/prospective­students/how­to­apply/
For questions about the application process, please contact
Karen Maldonado, Academic Advisor II, kaluna@uh.edu
Jim Parker, Academic Advisor I, jlparker9@uh.edu

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Rm. 312, SR1
University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204‐5007

1.3 Graduate Student Support

1.3.1 General Guidelines

Departmental support for graduate students includes Teaching Assistantships and Research Assistantships (see below). The duration of support and amount of funding is contingent on available resources. In accordance with University regulations, a student accepted into the program and offered Departmental support (e.g., Teaching Assistantship (TA) or Research Assistantship (RA)) may receive such support for up to 6 long semesters (3 years) for M.S. students and 10 long semesters (5 years) for doctoral students provided the student is maintaining a 3.0 cumulative GPA, is deemed to be making adequate progress toward the degree, is successfully performing the TA or RA duties, and such resources are available. Students must be registered as full time students and may not hold any additional employment while holding a TA or RA. Progress toward the degree will normally be measured in terms of course work (maintaining at least a B average), elimination of deficiencies, timely selection of a graduate committee, and completion of degree requirements within the specified time (see below). After the first year, progress will be evaluated and continued support will be granted on the basis of a favorable review. In addition, M.S. students receiving University support cannot switch to the Non‐Thesis M.S. option.

1.3.2 Teaching Assistantships (TA)

The Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences also provides support to well‐qualified, full time graduate students in the form of teaching assistantships. Students devote up to 20 hours per week in instructional and related duties. Teaching Assistantships provide valuable teaching experience for those individuals who are considering an academic career. They also provide all students with opportunities to acquire and improve their communication skills. All full time graduate students are eligible to apply for Teaching Assistantships.

1.3.3 Research Assistantships (RA)

Individual EAS faculty may have research funding to support graduate students for sponsored research programs. Full time graduate students are encouraged to explore such research opportunities.

1.3.4 Graduate Students Seeking Industry

Supported Summer Internships/ Permanent Employment ­ Graduate Internships are available to well‐qualified graduate students at both the masters and doctoral levels. Houston is home to the largest concentration of geoscientists in the world and provides unique opportunities for interaction between university researchers and industry scientists. Internships can involve students working with departmental faculty and a corporate sponsor on a collaborative research project. Students carry out their research both on campus and in the sponsor's laboratories to ensure access to a comprehensive set of analytical and computational facilities. A range of projects are currently available in both geology and geophysics. Students use internships to develop a fuller understanding of the scope of activities carried out by the corporate sponsor. The amount, eligibility conditions, and benefits associated with an internship will vary. Applicants for Internships must be full time graduate students. Please visit the Resources page on the department website for a list of some opportunities for students as well as the link to the EAS Recruiting Application.

1.3.5 Fellowships and Scholarships

Students seeking support from Fellowships and Scholarships should review the opportunities on the department website. Graduate Tuition Fellowships (GTF) can be offered to Ph.D. students who are supported as a research or teaching assistant and maintain a 3.0 or greater grade point average. The GTF can be offered up to 5 years, depending on student progress and available resources.

2. MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAMS

2.1 Background Requirements

Students applying for EAS M.S. programs are expected to have the necessary science and mathematics background appropriate to their discipline, as indicated below.

2.1.1 M.S. in Geology

Candidates for an M.S. degree in Geology should have successfully completed course work deemed equivalent to the University of Houston's undergraduate B.S. in Geology program. These courses include:

• GEOL 1330 (Physical Geology)
• GEOL 3370 (Mineralogy)
• GEOL 3330 (Paleobiology)
• GEOL 3372 (Petrography)
• GEOL 3340 (Geologic Field Methods)
• GEOL 3350 (Stratigraphy)
• GEOL 3373 (Igneous/Metamorphic Petrogenesis)
• GEOL 3345 (Structural Geology)
• GEOL 3374 (Sedimentary Petrogenesis)
• GEOL 4330 (Introduction to Geophysics)
• GEOL 3355 and 3360 (Field Camp)

Allied required courses include:

3 semesters of Calculus
2 semesters of Calculus‐based Physics 2 semesters of Chemistry.

Substitution of courses equivalent to those listed above as well as waivers of requirements will be considered on an individual basis. Applicants with a few deficiencies can satisfy those requirements while also taking graduate courses at the University of Houston; these requirements will be listed in an offer letter should the student be admitted. It is normally recommended that a student with 6 or more deficiency courses—e.g., those whose undergraduate degree was in another discipline—work toward a second undergraduate degree in Geology prior to graduate work.

2.1.2 M.S. in Geophysics

To ensure a common background for students in the Geophysics M.S. program, students should take or have successfully completed course work deemed equivalent to the following courses:

• GEOL 1330 (Physical Geology)
• GEOL 1130 (Physical Geology Laboratory)
• GEOL 3325 (Rocks and Minerals) or GEOL 3373 (Mineralogy) and GEOL 3372 (Petrography)
• GEOL 3340 (Geologic Field Methods)
• GEOL 3345 (Structural Geology)
• GEOL 3350 (Stratigraphy)
• GEOL 4330 (Introduction to Geophysics)
• MATH 3321 (Engineering Mathematics)
• MATH 3363 (Intro. to Partial Differential Equations)
• MATH 3364 (Intro. to Complex Analysis)

Substitution of courses equivalent to those listed above as well as waivers of requirements will be considered on an individual basis. Applicants with a few deficiencies can satisfy those requirements while also taking graduate courses at the University of Houston; these requirements will be listed in an offer letter should the student be admitted. It is normally recommended that a student with 6 or more deficiency courses, e.g., those whose undergraduate degree is in another discipline, consider working toward a second undergraduate degree in Geophysics prior to graduate work.

2.1.3 M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences

Candidates for an M.S. degree in Atmospheric Sciences are required to have the necessary background in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics. Candidates need to take the following courses or their equivalent.

• GEOL1302 (Introduction to Global Climate Change)
• GEOL1350 (Introduction to Meteorology)
• GEOL3342 (Principles of Air Pollution)
• GEOL3378 (Principles of Atmospheric Science)
• MATH2331 (Linear Algebra)
• MATH2433 (Calculus III)
• MATH3363 (Introduction to Partial Differential Equations)

Substitution of courses equivalent to those listed above as well as waivers of requirements will be considered on an individual basis. Applicants with a few deficiencies can satisfy those requirements while also taking graduate courses at the University of Houston; these requirements will be listed in an offer letter should the student be admitted. It is normally recommended that a student with 6 or more deficiency courses—e.g., those whose undergraduate degree was in another discipline—work toward a second undergraduate degree in Atmospheric Sciences prior to graduate work.

2.2 M.S. Thesis Option Program Requirements

2.2.1 M.S. Thesis Option

A minimum of thirty (30) credit hours is required for the M.S. degree in Geology, the M.S. degree in Geophysics and the M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences, six (6) of which are thesis hours. Twenty one (21) hours must consist of 6000 level EAS courses (including 6 hours of thesis credit), and the remaining nine (9) hours can be selected from the approved courses outside the area of EAS, but relevant to the degree program. No more than 6 hours of special problems courses can be counted towards the required 30 hour minimum. A maximum of 9 semester hours of graduate level course work may be transferred from other institutions, with the approval of the relevant graduate advisor and provided that they were not taken in the context of a previously earned degree, the grades are B or higher, and the courses were taken within 5 years from the time of graduation at UH.
2.2.1.1 Thesis Advisor/Committee
A formal thesis topic and thesis advisor must be chosen prior to the completion of 15 semester hours. The student and the advisor will together plan the remainder of the student’s course work. The 30 required hours are a minimum and, for a specific area of interest, it may be necessary for the student to complete additional course work. The initial selection of an advisor is not binding on the student or the faculty member. The student may change his/her thesis/dissertation advisor pending approval by the appropriate graduate advisor, but it is the responsibility of the student to review his/her degree plan and prepare for potential changes in university/faculty support with the new advisor. In addition, if the student has already formally proposed their project, they may have to present another thesis/dissertation proposal of their new project(s). Students must specify a thesis committee and have the names on file in the Office of the Dean at least one semester prior to their graduation. The committee must consist of a minimum of two faculty members who have their primary appointment within EAS and one approved member external to the major department from industry or academia who is acceptable to the department and approved by the college. A faculty member with a joint appointment in the major department is considered as an outside member unless he/she chairs the committee. In this case, an additional external member outside the major department is required. After these minimum requirements for committee members are satisfied, additional committee members may be approved from industry or academia, but at least 50% of the committee must be tenured/tenure-track faculty at the University of Houston. Research faculty or instructional faculty may serve on thesis committees but not chair the committees. However, a research professor may serve as a co-advisor with a tenured/tenured-track faculty.
2.2.1.2 Thesis Proposal
Students must present a thesis proposal. All full time students and students financially supported by the University must propose prior to the end of their second semester in the program (by the first Monday in November in the Fall semester, or the first Monday in April in the Spring semester). Scheduling of the thesis proposal is done by each applicant through the departmental Academic Advisor. Proposals (and re‐ proposals) can be scheduled Monday‐Friday, with starting times between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., during the Fall and Spring semesters. Proposals cannot be presented during Summer sessions, vacations, reading days, weekends, or final examination periods (nor over spring or inter‐semester breaks). Two hours should be allocated for the thesis proposal presentation and questions. Proposals are preceded by the distribution of a 5 to 10 page (10 page suggested maximum for text) written description of the thesis project to the thesis committee. A one page abstract must be posted and distributed to all EAS faculty members at least seven calendar days prior to presentation, and a copy of the full proposal filed with the departmental Advising Assistant at that time. The proposal abstract must contain the title, time and place of the proposal, and the names of the committee members. The thesis advisor and at least one other member of the committee must initial the abstract prior to posting, indicating that they approve of the presentation of the proposal. Upon successful presentation of the proposal, a copy of the complete proposal with the thesis advisor’s signature indicating approval must be placed in the student's permanent academic file.
2.2.1.3 Thesis Defense

Upon completion of the research and the writing of a thesis deemed acceptable by the thesis committee, a defense of the thesis is scheduled by the student. A public defense of the complete thesis research will be presented to the faculty at large and may be attended by any other interested parties. An abstract, which lists the time and place of the defense, must be distributed to the department faculty and posted publicly at least seven calendar days prior to the scheduled date. The thesis advisor and at least one other departmental committee member must initial the notice of defense, thus indicating that they approve of the defense. An unbound copy of the thesis draft, including all illustrations, must be made available in the departmental office at least seven calendar days prior to the defense date for inspection by the faculty of the Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences. M.S. defenses can be scheduled Monday‐Friday during the Spring, Summer, and Fall semesters with starting times between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Defenses cannot be given during vacations, reading days, weekends, or final examination periods (nor over spring or inter‐semester breaks). Scheduling of defenses is done through the departmental Advising Assistant. A vote to pass by a majority of the Thesis Committee is required for successful defense of the thesis.

2.2.1.4 Course Work

Upon completion of their program, students are expected to have breadth and a fundamental background in the essential elements of their chosen EAS discipline.

M.S. Geology

In order to insure breadth, each student is required to take at least one course from 3 of the 4 Graduate Core Course Categories. The categories are:
1. Igneous/Geochemistry (and Metamorphic Petrology)
2. Softrock (Sedimentary Geology)
3. Structure/Tectonics
4. Applied/Analytical

M.S. Geophysics  

To provide a fundamental background in the essential elements of geophysics, all students are required to take the following 4 Core Courses:
1. GEOL 7330 (Potential Field Methods of Geophysical Exploration)
2. GEOL 7341 (Geophysical Data Processing)
3. GEOL 7333 (Seismic Wave and Ray Theory)
4. GEOL 7324 (Rock Physics)

Students are encouraged to make their selections for other graduate courses after consultation with their thesis or graduate advisor.

M.S. Atmospheric Sciences

In order to insure breadth, each student is required to take at least one course from each of the three Atmospheric Sciences Graduate Core Categories:

1. Atmospheric Dynamics and Physics
2. Atmospheric Chemistry
3. Atmospheric Measurement and Modeling

2.3 M.S. Non Thesis Option Program Requirements

2.3.1 M.S. Non Thesis option

Students who are accepted into the non‐thesis M.S. degree plan will not be required to complete a thesis, but must take additional coursework and complete a capstone research project in order to obtain the M.S. degree.
Non‐thesis M.S. students must complete 39 course credit hours for the degree. All courses must be formal courses (for example, research and seminar hours do not count toward this degree) in the EAS program. Thirty (30) hours must consist of 6000 level EAS courses, and the remaining 6 hours (6000 level or above) can be selected in other departments. A maximum of 9 semester hours of graduate level course work can be transferred from other institutions, provided they were not taken in the context of a previously earned degree, that the grades are B or higher, and that the courses were taken within the last 5 years from the time of graduation from UH. Non‐thesis option students are required to complete a three hour capstone course.
After completion of 18 hours, students with a GPA of 3.4 and above and demonstrated abilities to conduct research may petition to switch to a thesis-based degree. In order to do this, the student must have an advisor and committee members willing to supervise them. The thesis research advisor, Geology Graduate Advisor, and Department Chair must sign a petition indicating approval of the change to a thesis-based M.S. degree option and it must be filed with the Academic Advisor.
For all professional master’s degrees there is a set curriculum that must be completed without substitution. Both curricula are listed online under the respective discipline tracks and include courses to insure compliance with those listed in sections 2.3.1 above and section 2.3.2 below. Further, the required capstone project is a rigorous technical research project and the guidelines are online under the professional master’s course descriptions.

2.3.2 Course Work

Upon completion of their program, students are expected to have breadth and a fundamental background in the essential elements of their chosen EAS discipline.

M.S. Geology Non-Thesis Option - In order to insure breadth, each student is required to take at least one course from 3 of the 4 Graduate Core Course Work Categories. The categories are:

1. Igneous/Geochemistry (and Metamorphic Petrology),
2. Softrock (Sedimentary Geology),
3. Structure/Tectonics, and
4. Applied/Analytical

M.S. Geophysics Non-Thesis Option - To provide a fundamental background in the essential elements of geophysics, all students are required to take the following 4 Core Courses:

1. GEOL 7330 (Potential Field Methods of Geophysical Exploration)
2. GEOL 7341 (Geophysical Data Processing)
3. GEOL 7333 (Seismic Wave and Ray Theory)
4. GEOL 7324 (Rock Physics)

Students are encouraged to make their selections of the remaining graduate courses after consultation with their graduate advisor.

3. DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

3.1 Degree Requirements

• All doctoral students must have a minimum of one continuous academic year (two terms (Fall/Spring or Spring/Summer/Fall)) as a full‐time student which consists of 9.0 Credit Hours per term.
• A student working on a dissertation must be continuously enrolled in a minimum of 3.0 Credit Hours of doctoral research each Fall and Spring term, and in a minimum of 3.0 Credit Hours of doctoral dissertation in their final term.
• Up to 6.0 Credit Hours of courses taken outside the department, but relevant to the degree program, can apply to the degree with prior approval from the Atmospheric Science Graduate Faculty Advisor.
Course Requirements
Credit hours required for this degree: 54.0
a) PhD students entering with a MS degree
• Formal EAS courses including core classes Credit Hours: 18.0
• Dissertation Credit Hours: 6.0
The remaining hours may include Coursework, Doctoral Research, Seminars and Special Problems 
b) PhD students entering with a Bachelor’s degree
• Formal EAS elective courses Credit Hours: 15.0
• EAS Core Category Course Selections Credit Hours: 9.0
• Dissertation Credit Hours: 3.0 - 12.0

3.2 Sequence and Timing Summary

Evaluation of application:

• Course deficiencies will be identified by the graduate advisors and communicated to the student in the admission letter (if applicable).

First year in program:

• All course requirements associated with deficiencies must be completed
• Establishment of Ph.D. Research Committee
• Initiation of research

Second year in program:

• Pass the Ph.D. qualifying exam
• Presenting Research and Dissertation Proposals during the second year
• Completion of all (or most) formal course work

Third and successive years:

• Completion and defense of dissertation.

3.2.1 Research Advisor/Research Committee

Ph.D. applicants are encouraged to formulate their dissertation committee promptly in order to ensure proper guidance throughout their research. Doctoral students’ dissertation committees must be comprised of a minimum of four members to include three faculty members who have their primary appointment within EAS and one approved member external to the major department from industry or academia who is acceptable to the department and approved by the college. A faculty member with a joint appointment in EAS is considered as an outside member unless he/she chairs the committee. In this case, an additional external member outside the major department is required. After these minimum requirements for committee members are satisfied, additional committee members may be approved from industry or academia, but at least 50% of the committee must to be tenured/tenure-track faculty at the University of Houston. Research faculty or instructional faculty may serve on dissertation committees, but not chair the committees. However, a research professor may serve as a co-advisor with a tenured/tenure-track faculty. Candidates must specify a dissertation committee and have the names on file in the Office of the Dean at least one semester prior to their graduation.

3.2.2 Candidacy ­

To become a candidate for the doctoral degree a student must meet a set of requirements established by the Earth & Atmospheric Sciences Department. For all EAS doctoral aspirants there are two options available to attain candidacy. It is the responsibility of the dissertation advisor to notify the Academic Advisor and applicable graduate advisor which path to candidacy the graduate student will undertake by the end  of the semester preceding the candidacy exam or paper submission (Candidacy Options 1 and 2, respectively. See below).

Candidacy Option 1 – Oral Exam and Proposal. A five member examining committee will administer a written exam, approximately 4 hours in length, given during the seventh to eighth week of each semester. It will test the breadth of the candidate’s knowledge within their sub‐discipline, (i.e., Geology, Geophysics or Atmospheric Science). Approval by a majority of the members of the examining committee is required for the student to pass the examination. At the discretion of the examining committee, a student who fails the general examination can be permitted to re‐take it; however, the exam cannot be taken more than twice by the applicant. Re‐examination will take place within one (1) month of the initial examination. The student must pass the Candidacy Examination before proceeding to the Dissertation Proposal. All candidacy and proposal requirements must be completed by the end of the 4th semester in the program.

Candidacy Option 2 – Manuscript Submission and Proposal. Submission of a manuscript to an Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)-indexed, peer‐reviewed journal by the 6th week of the fourth semester in the program and approval of an oral and written Ph.D. proposal. Research work for the manuscript must have been completed at UH. This timing implies that the student is full‐ time and supported as a Research Assistant (RA) or Teaching Assistant (TA). In order to proceed along this pathway for the Ph.D., the advisor and research committee must agree that the candidate has produced a publishable manuscript capable of passing a rigorous external peer‐review for a scientific journal and has completed and successfully defended a research proposal. Prior to the presentation of the dissertation proposal, the manuscript must be submitted to a peer‐reviewed journal. The oral proposal of the dissertation must be presented before the end of the 4th semester.

3.2.3 Dissertation Proposal

The oral dissertation proposal will be given during the semester in which the candidacy exam has been successfully completed (Candidacy Option  1) or the manuscript has been submitted to an approved peer‐reviewed journal (i.e. before the end of the fourth semester) (Candidacy Option 2). Ph.D. proposals can take place Monday‐Friday, with starting times between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., during the Fall and Spring semesters. The proposal must be presented by the first Monday in November in the Fall semester, or the first Monday in April in the Spring semester. Proposals cannot be presented during Summer terms, vacations, reading days, weekends, or final examination periods (nor over spring or inter‐semester breaks). A minimum of two hours should be allocated for the Dissertation Proposal presentation and questions.

Proposal presentations are preceded by the distribution of a research committee approved 5 to 10 page (10 page maximum for text) written description of the dissertation project. A one page abstract must be posted and distributed to all Faculty members at least seven calendar days prior to presentation and a copy of the full proposal filed with the departmental Academic Advisor at that time. The proposal abstract must contain the title, time and place of the proposal, and the names of the committee members. The dissertation advisor and at least one other member of the committee must initial the abstract prior to posting, thus indicating that they approve of the presentation of the proposal. The oral presentation, approximately 30 to 45 minutes long, will be followed by a period during which all present can ask questions of the student related to the suitability and feasibility of the project, as well as the student’s ability to perform the research. All faculty present can participate in the deliberations. All Earth & Atmospheric Sciences Faculty as well as other committee members present may vote on the success or failure of the student’s performance in the Dissertation Proposal. Approval by a majority of those voting is needed to pass the proposal. Upon successful presentation of the Dissertation Proposal, the student will be granted Ph.D. Candidacy status. Upon successful presentation of the proposal, a copy of the complete proposal with the dissertation advisor’s signature indicating approval of the proposal as originally presented or modified must be placed in the student's permanent academic file.

The Examining Committee, at their discretion, can allow a student who failed the Dissertation Proposal to re‐propose, this, however, can be done no more than once. The second presentation must take place within 30 calendar days of the initial presentation.

3.2.4 Dissertation Defense

A public oral defense of the complete dissertation research will be presented to the Faculty at large and may be attended by any other interested parties. Prior to the defense of the dissertation, students who chose Candidacy Option 1 will submit at least two (2) completed manuscripts, based on the dissertation research, to a peer‐reviewed qualified journal. Students choosing Candidacy Option 2) must have one accepted and another manuscript submitted to a qualified peer-reviewed journal before defending the Ph.D. dissertation. These manuscripts must have been judged publication‐ready by the dissertation advisor before submission. For the defense, an abstract, which lists the time and place of the defense, must be distributed to the departmental faculty and posted publicly at least seven calendar days before the scheduled date for the defense. The dissertation advisor and at least one other committee member must initial the notice of defense, indicating approval of the defense. An unbound copy of the final draft of the dissertation, including all illustrations, must be made available in the EAS departmental office at least seven calendar days before the defense date for inspection by the faculty of the Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences. Ph.D. defenses can be given Monday‐Friday during the Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters with starting times between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Defenses cannot be given during vacations, reading days, weekends, or final examination periods (nor over spring or inter‐semester breaks). Scheduling of defenses is done through the Advising Assistant. A positive vote by a majority of the Dissertation Committee is required for a successful defense of the dissertation. If the student does not complete and successfully defend the Ph.D. dissertation within five years after passing the Candidacy Examination, retaking of the Candidacy Examination may be required. The format of the dissertation must follow the NSM guidelines. Questions pertaining to specific requirements should be addressed to the appropriate Graduate Advisor.

4.0 GRADUATE ADVISOR CONTACT INFORMATION

Shuhab Khan – Geology graduate advisor – sdkhan@uh.edu

Guoquan Wang – Geophysics graduate advisor – gwang@uh.edu

Xun Jiang – Atmospheric Sciences graduate advisor ‐ xjiang7@uh.edu

Don Van Nieuwenhuise – Professional Master’s advisor ‐ donvann@uh.edu

Karen Maldonado – Academic Advisor II – kaluna@uh.edu

Jim Parker ‐ Academic Advisor I ‐ jlparker9@uh.edu