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Juan Barthelemy

Assistant Professor

jbarthel@central.uh.edu 
Room: 340 Social Work Building
Phone: 713-743-6634
Current Curriculum Vitae

PERSONAL STATEMENT

Juan J. Barthelemy is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of Houston’s Graduate College of Social Work. He has about 20 years of practice experience working with at-risk African American youth. Dr. Barthelemy’s research focuses on community engagement strategies to reduce violent crime. Dr. Barthelemy has been funded to conduct research focused on community capacity building, violence intervention development and implementation, and monitoring the effects of group violence reduction strategies on homicides and other violent crimes. Through developing collaborative relationships within certain African-American communities, significant decreases in fatal and non-fatal shootings have been observed. Dr. Barthelemy is also interested in research that focuses on increasing school engagement for youth who may be at risk for dropping out of school and engaging in future criminal behaviors.  

Education

Ph.D.     University of Tennessee, Knoxville               Social Work                May 2005
MSW     Washington University in St. Louis               Social Work                 May 1999
MAE      University of Northern Iowa                         Ed. Psychology            May 1995
BA        Southern University at New Orleans              Psychology                 May 1993

LICENSES AND CERTIFICATIONS 

Texas Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW)
Louisiana Licensed Clinical Social Worker and a Board Approved Clinical Supervisor (LCSW-BACS)

COURSES TAUGHT 

  • Practice/Human Behavior in the Social Environment
  • Human Development and Human Diversity

RESEARCH INTERESTS 

  • Increasing school engagement for youth have been identified as at-risk for future criminal behaviors
  • Community engagement strategies to reduce juvenile violent crime
  • Group and gang violence reduction strategies
  • Adolescent aggression and school based violence interventions