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Social Science, Arts and Humanities

Humanities Connections

The Humanities Connections program seeks to expand the role of the humanities in undergraduate education at two- and four-year institutions. Awards will support innovative curricular approaches that foster productive partnerships among humanities faculty and their counterparts in the social and natural sciences and in pre-service or professional programs (such as business, engineering, health sciences, law, computer science, and other technology-driven fields), in order to encourage and develop new integrative learning opportunities for students. Competitive applications will demonstrate: that the proposed curricular projects address significant and compelling topics or issues in undergraduate education at the applicant institution(s); that these projects develop the intellectual skills and habits of mind cultivated by the humanities; and that faculty and students will benefit from meaningful collaborations in teaching and learning across disciplines as a result of the project. Humanities Connections projects have four core features: integration of the subject matter, perspectives, and pedagogical approaches of two or more disciplines (with a minimum of one in and one outside of the humanities); collaboration between faculty from two or more separate departments or schools at one or more institutions; experiential learning as an intrinsic part of the curricular plan; and long-term institutional support for the proposed curriculum innovation(s). Humanities Connections grants are funded at two levels: Planning and Implementation. Planning Grants (up to twelve months) support the interdisciplinary collaboration of faculty from two or more separate departments or schools (a minimum of one in and one outside of the humanities), with the goal of designing a new, coherent curricular program or initiative. The award gives the institution(s) the opportunity to create a firm foundation for implementing the program. Planning goals will include identifying the members of a planning committee and organizing the planning process; defining the rationale, design, and structure that would undergird a comprehensive and institutionally sustainable effort; and establishing potential scenarios for curriculum development. Institutions may draw on current short-term initiatives or curricular programs run by individual departments in this effort. The outcome of a successful planning phase should be a project in, or ready for, the implementation stage. Implementation grants (up to three years) support the interdisciplinary collaboration of faculty from two or more separate departments or schools (a minimum of one in and one outside of the humanities), with the implementation of a sustainable curricular program or initiative as the outcome. Implementation grant proposals must show unambiguous evidence of preceding planning work and present a defined rationale with clear intellectual and logistical objectives that are supported by institutional commitment. The award gives applicants the opportunity to build on faculty/administrative or institutional partnerships and to develop and refine the project’s intellectual content, design, and scope. For example, the applicant should be able to demonstrate potential commitments of any partners or collaborators; outline preferred approaches to curriculum building/consolidation; and explain outreach strategies that will be employed to attract students to the new educational opportunity.

Proposal: 10/17/2018

 

Literature Fellowships: Translation Projects, FY2020

An individual may submit only one application for FY 2020 funding. You may not apply for both a Translation Project under this deadline (December 5, 2018) and a Literature Fellowship (in prose or poetry) under the 2019 deadline (when fellowships in prose are offered). The Arts Endowment’s support of a project may begin any time between November 1, 2019, and November 1, 2020, and extend for up to two years. Grant Program Description Through fellowships to published translators, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) supports projects for the translation of specific works of prose, poetry, or drama from other languages into English. We encourage translations of writers and of work that are not well represented in English translation. All proposed projects must be for creative translations of literary material into English. The work to be translated should be of interest for its literary excellence and value. Priority will be given to projects that involve work that has not previously been translated into English.

Application: 12/5/2018

 

Department of Justice

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Documenting Endangered Languages

This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the development of the next generation of researchers. Funding can support fieldwork and other activities relevant to the digital recording, documenting, and archiving of endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases. Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year senior research grants, fellowships from six to twelve months, and conference proposals.

Proposal: 11/19/2018

 

National Park Service

African American Civil Rights (AACR) History Grants

The National Park Service's (NPS) African American Civil Rights Grant Program (AACR) will document, interpret, and preserve the sites related to the African American struggle to gain equal rights as citizens in the 20th Century. The NPS 2008 report, "Civil Rights in America, A Framework for Identifying Significant Sites," will serve as the reference document in determining the appropriateness of proposed projects and properties. AACR Grants are funded by the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF), administered by the NPS, and will fund a broad range of preservation projects for historic sites including: architectural services, historic structure reports, preservation plans, and physical preservation to structures. Grants are awarded through a competitive process and do not require non-Federal match.

Application: 10/8/2018